Imperial titles

As it grew, the Khamenesh Empire absorbed and supplanted the fallen remnants of Bael Turath. Because of this, Imperial titles and styles of address are an extension of those used in Bael Turath.

  • Padishah – a title reserved solely for the reigning Emperor after his coronation. Padishah was claimed by Emperor Yeohgul after accepting fealty from the former royal houses of Bael Turath. The Tiefling emperor was titled ‘Shah-i-shah’ (King of kings), Yeohgul declared himself ‘Padishah’ (“King without peer”). The Padishah is styled “His Imperial Majesty”.
  • Vizir – Less a title and more a role, Vizir refers to a trusted counselor or lieutenant of either the Padishah or one of the Great Shahs. A vizier acting in his role is styled “Righteousness”.
  • Shah – the ruler of a Great House and head of the family, the early Shahs were kings in their own right. They are still styled “Royal Highness”.
  • Amir – High nobility, an amir is typically a close blood relation to the shah of a house, and typically styled “Grace” or “Royal Grace” depending on the degree of relationship to the Imperial house.
  • Mirza – Derived from the phrase amirzada (“son of the amir”), this title denotes a direct lineage to a higher noble title. One of this rank is styled “Eminence”.
  • Khan – Another title that denotes a role, ‘Khan’ denotes an army commander, second only to a sovereign. A khan (and possibly his subordinates, ilkhan and khanzadeh) may be raised from common stock. A khan is typically styled “Illustrious”, although if they also possess a noble title they might use that style instead.
  • Bey – The lowest permanent nobility, a Bey is the ruler of a small dominion as a vassal of (typically) an amir. They are styled “Excellency”.
  • Efendi – Typically the highest title a commoner can aspire to, efendi denotes a patent of recognition by the local nobility. They are typically styled “Sir” or “Madam”.

Imperial titles

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